An Essay on Collectivist Economics

(By: Bruno Lima Rocha)

This essay is the beginning of an attempt to develop a left libertarian approach toward an economic model, specifically to a model which is compatible with the political formations of Democratic Confederalism, also referred to as Libertarian Municipalism. At this stage the goal is the development of a working set of tools of analysis, and foster learning among the Libertarian Left. To this end I submit this relatively simple text to provide accessible notions for those struggling to build a society based on Democratic Confederalism.

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5 Things to Take Away from the Brisbane G20 People’s Summit

(By: Nicholas García)

In the three days prior to this year’s G20 summit in Brisbane Nov. 15-16th organizers and activists from around the world gathered for the G20 people’s summit: a mix of demonstrations, workshops, panels and music as an alternative global summit against the G20 agenda. While G20 was promoting further free trade agreements and entrenching corporate interests in the political sphere the people’s summit put climate change and social justice issues in the forefront of their agenda. Panels included topics such as climate justice, feminism, indigenous struggles, and confronting neoliberal capitalism. It provided an avenue not only to make apparent how G20 is an opportunity to further strengthen political and economic elite interests throughout the world, but also for an avenue connecting diverse issues to the types of free trade policies pursued by these elite. In case you missed it, here are the 5 biggest things that went down at the people’s summit: Continue reading

“A Strike, That No One Recognizes Is Per Definition Not a Strike”*

(By conjuncture magazine)

*“Ein Streik, den niemand spürt, ist eben kein Streik.” C. Heinrich, ARD Berlin

At various places in the US, the invitation or even the demand to unionize becomes more and more common. Well visited Labor Notes Conferences, the Fight for 15, the IWW at San Francisco’s Whole Foods Markets — after decades of attacks on workers rights, mendacious campaigns under the label of “right to work“ and an unshakable belief in the free market — eventually there seems to be a shift in society, a change in the understanding of workers rights and a growing wish to take back the workspace, collectively. Continue reading

Dispatch from Guatemala

(By: Areli Palomo)

I had been trying to reach Doña Mari for days; she is a woman that sells food in a port located in the pacific side of the Guatemalan coast. I met her a year ago when I was researching places that are used by Central Americans and by people from other parts of the world to avoid getting caught by Mexican authorities when crossing this country’s southern border. Continue reading

Brazil and the Elections in the Second Round

(by: Bruno Lima Rocha; Translated by: conjuncture magazine)

The development of the conservative vote and the difficult strategies to react for the popular movement

Latin America’s leading country, Mercosur and diplomatic agreements have found themselves at a crossroads. There is a consensus from the middle to the bottom of the social pyramid in Brazil. Middle class voters admit to step back in terms of political ideas and to not tolerate debates that try to weaken the State’s role in economic strategies and in its function to secure the material basis of everyday life for its inhabitants.

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BRICS and the New Axis of Expansionist Capitalism

BRICS

(by: Bruno Lima Rocha. Translated by: Daniel Gutiérrez)

The BRICS alliance — a bloc of countries formed by the meetings of their leaders and without any formal documentation — has once again caught the world’s attention for trying a new hand in global power politics. The premise of the relationship between Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa is based on the economy and the potential of sharing a common destination point. Culturally, Brazil is most similar to post-Apartheid South Africa, and proportionally we carry a similar weight to Latin America, as does South Africa to sub-saharan Africa.

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The global power of finance capital – the effects in Brazil

(By: Bruno Lima Rocha)

This article is the part of a series dealing with macro-economic structures and their effects in Brazil. Here I describe the visible effects of a rentier logic in the country. Rentiers are those that live on dividends and profits, and not through direct work – in other words, those who live by exploiting the labor power of others. For a class to enjoy the status of rentiers, there must be a consistent and reliable mechanisms of class power able to extract rents from the productive economy – from the working class. Continue reading

Chile: Neoliberal Paradise for a Few, Capitalist Hell for the Majority

(By La batalla de los trabajadores; translated by Pablo Pérez)

Chile is one of the OECD countries where the actual wage of the workers (i.e. the difference between the received wage and the level of the prices) is the lowest. Although both the prices and per capita income statistics (which are around $1,300 per month) are close to those of a first world country, they hide a terrible reality for the working class. Continue reading

The Brazilian World Cup in the Age of the Commodity of Images

(credit: Agencia Brasil)

(credit: Agencia Brasil)

(by: Dijair Brilhantes and Bruno Lima Rocha)

Below, we explain examples of the advancement of the market logic within the World Cup Brazil 2014, and how this mode of operation influences within the game, and as always, more of the same regarding the arbitrariness of FIFA. Continue reading

The Anger of the Brazilian Elite and the Lack of Ruling Class National Identification

(by: Dijair Brilhantes and Bruno Lima Rocha)

The FIFA World Cup is considered one of the biggest events in the world. It should come as no surprise then that the commands of the institution that is run by Seth Blatter should continue to make hundreds of demands against the country that is to welcome the games. In practice, this means that fundamental rights are to be suspended, especially in a country with a “leftist” government. Just another day in the tropical country.

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