Interview about Rojava – Topics for Debate: Questions about the Strategic Scope

[Editors Note: A dear friend and supporter of ours from Brazil, Dr. Bruno Lima Rocha, established contact with a series of organizations involved in the social revolution taking place in Kurdistan. Mainstream media sources have largely failed to cover the social process, though news have been able to break the radio silence. This is the second internview we publish in this series
It should also be said that minor grammatical errors were corrected (as neither participant in the interview is native to english). But most is left in the original form, for fear of losing accuarcy.]

Interview about Rojava – Topics for debate: Questions about the Strategic Scope

Introduction: Since the Kobanê siege started I have dedicated several hours per week to understand and divulgate as much as possible about this social revolution, initiated in a combination of Democratic Confederalism and the Syrian civil war. As a militant, I always have been involved in international solidarity. As an Arab descendant, I always have been trying to find a reliable left-wing force combining direct action and internal democracy. Continue reading

Bombs in Santiago and the Urgent Need of Deep Reflection

(by: Felipe Ramirez; Translated by: Daniel Gutiérrez)

Note: On September 8th, a bomb blew up in a metro station of Santiago, Chile. Although the city has witnessed more than 200 explosions over the last five years, this was the first time in which the targets were civilians—until now all the bombs attacks had been directed towards “symbolic targets” as banks, churches, and police stations. However, both the hour of the explosion (2:30pm) and the place were the bomb was left (one of the most transited metro station in Santiago) made this terrorist attack the most serious one. The blast injured 14 people, one of who—a female janitor who had direct contact with the bomb, which was put in a trashcan—lost several fingers of his hand. Even though three people were accused three weeks ago, the investigations are still in progress.

In this article the libertarian journalist Felipe Ramirez examines the incident, developing a lucid analysis of different hypothesis that might explain the terrorist attack. Then he concludes with some reflections on the role that the Left should play before incidents like this.

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“Liberation from Oakland to Palestine,” Bay Area marches connect the dots of US state violence

Little girl holding up a sign chanting ” Hands up! Don’t shoot! rest in peace Michael Brown” (image courtesy of Minister Finishes: twitter @federal_flashes)

(by: Nicholas García)

On the weekend of August 15th, organizers in the Bay Area led two major demonstrations: the Friday Ferguson Solidarity march from Downtown Oakland to Berkeley, and the Saturday “Block the Boat for Palestine” march from the West Oakland BART station to the Oakland Port. These two marches could have been separate, focusing on their own single issue demands for justice in Ferguson or in Palestine. Rather, their demands, rallying cries, and frameworks intersected and crossed together. Continue reading

Riots Work: How Riots in Ferguson, Missouri, Were Able to Transform the Discourse of an Entire Nation

(by: Daniel Gutiérrez)

The images are brutal. From armored personnel carriers, to sniper’s perched on rooftops, clouds of tear gas billowing down streets, the sudden sparks of flash-bang grenades — it is no wonder that the web is in an uproar and drawing the immediate response that Ferguson has become a war zone.

In less than two weeks, an unknown blip on the North American map has become the central debate of a superpower. One that thought it answered the question of race decades ago (at least, for those that are white).

While sociologists and government analysts are most likely scrambling to formulate theories as to why the killing of this unarmed black male created such uproar, the elephant in the room is quite clear.

Riots work.

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Chile: Neoliberal Paradise for a Few, Capitalist Hell for the Majority

(By La batalla de los trabajadores; translated by Pablo Pérez)

Chile is one of the OECD countries where the actual wage of the workers (i.e. the difference between the received wage and the level of the prices) is the lowest. Although both the prices and per capita income statistics (which are around $1,300 per month) are close to those of a first world country, they hide a terrible reality for the working class. Continue reading

The Anger of the Brazilian Elite and the Lack of Ruling Class National Identification

(by: Dijair Brilhantes and Bruno Lima Rocha)

The FIFA World Cup is considered one of the biggest events in the world. It should come as no surprise then that the commands of the institution that is run by Seth Blatter should continue to make hundreds of demands against the country that is to welcome the games. In practice, this means that fundamental rights are to be suspended, especially in a country with a “leftist” government. Just another day in the tropical country.

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Follow-up on #Ohlauer: Refugess back to the border – Kreuzberg under Law and Order

(By: Roger Buer, text and photos)

ohlauer_1

Those who are squatting a school at the Ohlauer Straße in Kreuzberg, Berlin are still willing to stay on the rooftop of the building – and are still prepared to kill themselves in case of a police raid. Continue reading

State Exerts Power Over Refugee Squat

(By: conjuncture magazine; special thanks to neukoellnbild, photographer)

24.06.2014 berlin-kreuzberg: teilräumung der gerhart-hauptmann-schule #28

Tuesday morning the police moved to evict a former school that is being squatted by refugees. The Gerhart-Hauptmann-Schule on Ohlauer Straße, in the neighbourhood of Kreuzberg, Berlin, has been squatted for the last year and a half. It became a central spot for the refugee strike, a movement fighting for equal rights for refugees in Europe during the last two years. Continue reading